Monday, November 7, 2016

How to Write an Excellent College Essay

How to Write College Essay
It is hard for a lot of different reasons. Sometimes it is hard because you don't know your audience and have to guess. Sometimes it is hard because you have a lot of stories tripping over each other to get onto the page. Sometimes it is hard because, no matter how smoothly you try to form your sentences, they invariably tumble out of you, all stiff and angular like a box of bent pipes. But being able to write well is important. Your essay reveals something important about you that your grades and test scores can't your personality. It can give admission officers a sense of who you are, as well as showcasing your writing skills.

Starting the essay can be the hardest part. Brainstorming about your personality traits and defining your strengths is a good place to begin. After you've gathered your notes, create an outline to organize your essay and decide where you want examples to appear. Now you're ready to write your first draft. Don't worry about making it perfect. Just get your ideas flowing and your thoughts down on paper. You'll fix mistakes and improve the writing in later drafts. Develop three essay parts;
  1. Introduction: One paragraph that introduces your essay.
  2. Body: Several paragraphs explaining the main idea with examples.
  3. Conclusion: One paragraph that summarizes and ends the essay.

Give your essay focus by figuring out how the question relates to your personal qualities and then taking a specific angle. Make sure everything you write supports that viewpoint. You can take help from admission essay writing services if you feel any difficulty inside your essay. Read about how some students conquered the essay. The essay question might ask you about your best quality, an experience that shaped you or the reason you want to attend a certain college. Don't be tempted to write what you think the admission officers want to hear; answer the question honestly.

Little Things that Help Make It Excellent:
Show your draft to family, friends or teachers. Ask if it makes sense and sounds like you. Consider their feedback and make changes, but keep your voice. Make sure the essay is in your own voice. Read your essay over carefully to check for typos and spelling and grammar errors. It's best to ask someone who hasn't seen it yet to take a look as well. They're likely to see mistakes you won't catch.

Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print. Never use a long word where a short one will do. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. Never use the passive where you can use the active. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous. Find a subject you care about. Do not ramble. Keep it simple. Have the guts to cut. Sound like yourself. Say what you mean to say.

0 comments:

Post a Comment